Friday, 21 October 2011 07:57

Antenatal & Postnatal Depression

Preemie Help would like to introduce the newest expert to contribute an article in their area of expertise. Natalie Worth is a Clinical Psychologist who specializes in the treatment of women with post natal adjustment and depression issues.

Post Natal depression is sometimes referred to as Postpartum depression, whereas Post Natal and Ante Natal Depression are also both called Perinatal depression or PND for short.

Both antenatal and postnatal depression have long been significant issues, for women in particular, which has largely been avoided and not spoken of. The good news is, the conversations around this topic are increasing and women are more likely to discuss, report, or seek help for perinatal depression compared with 10 years ago. The other very important issue is that perinatal depression often responds very well to early detection followed by well chosen treatment, under good medical and psychological direction.

Natalie Worth is an expert in this area and helps many families with perinatal depression, inlcuding parents of preemies. Her tails are as follows;

  • Natalie Worth
  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Adelaide Hills South Australia
  • Mobile number 0413 984 724
  • Fax Number 8388 0745
  • Individual and Group Therapy

Natalie sees women with post natal adjustment and depression issues and offer groups and one to one services. Currently the groups have openings and she can offer a one off interview prior to joining a group and then in 1 month or so, she will have more one to one counselling spots available too. Natalie is based in Littlehampton South Australia - her contact details for clients and workers is 0413 984 724. She is able to offer Medicare rebates for clients who are GP referred with a mental health care plan , and her current gap is $30.20, with some discounts and the group out of pocket fee is lower than this too.

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 04 July 2012 20:42

Photo Competition Winners Announced

Congratulations to the preemiehelp photo competition winners!

Thanks too all the people that entered our Preemiehelp Photo competition.

The winners share in great prizes including, the preemiehelp ebook, “The Complete Guide to: Preemie Development.” and a Earlybirds Gift voucher (2 x $50) from Earlybirds

And the Winners are...

After much deliberation we can annouce the winners of the Preemiehelp 'preemie photo competition' .

Prizes are awarded for 3 categories

  • Life in the NICU
  • My Brave Preemie
  • Look at Me Now 

After an overwhelming responce to the competition we are happy to announce that..

In First Place

Collecting a prize of $50 Earlybirds Voucher (earlybirds.com.au) and a full set of the Preemiehelp "The preemie guide to: Surviving the NICU" & " The preemie guide to: Preemie development" is:

Angela Perry - Life in the NICU

With her winning photo - 

Photo: 1st - Angela Perry (Life in the NICU)

 

 

In Second Place

Collecting a prize of $50 Earlybirds Voucher (earlybirds.com.au) and the Preemiehelp ebook " The preemie guide to: Preemie development" is:

Andrea Creighton - My Brave Preemie

With her winning photo -

Photo: 2nd - Andrea Creighton (My brave preemie)

 

 

In Third Place

Collecting a full set of the Preemiehelp ebooks  "The preemie guide to: Surviving the NICU" & " The preemie guide to: Preemie development" is:

Ken & Lisa Young - Look at me now

With their winning photo -

Photo: 3rd - Ken & Lisa Young (Look at me now)

 

 

Published in Industry News
Monday, 31 December 2012 13:02

Persistent Language Problems

Babies born premature have poorer language abilities when compared to their peers at seven years of age, a Murdoch Childrens Research Institute study has found.

Researchers investigated language abilities in 198 children born very preterm (less than 32 weeks) and very low birth weight (less than 1500 grams) at seven years of age and compared their performance with 70 children who were born at term. Researchers also looked for white matter abnormalities as they hypothesised those children born preterm would demonstrate impaired language function because of the presence of diffuse white matter abnormalities.

The study, which is published in Journal of Pediatrics, found the group of children born very premature performed significantly worse than the children born at term on all language areas assessed including spoken word awareness, semantics, grammar, discourse and pragmatics.

The study showed that white matter abnormality occurring during the neonatal period was a key predictive factor for four out of five language areas seven years later. White matter abnormalities were associated with performance in phonological awareness, semantics, grammar, and discourse.

However, the results indicated that other factors associated with prematurity are also likely to influence language ability. Researchers said it's possible that environmental factors provide additional influence on language abilities; however, say further research is needed to understand the most significant determinants of cognitive skills.

Lead researcher, A/Professor Peter Anderson said the study highlights that families should closely monitor their child's language development.

The study, which is published in Journal of Pediatrics, found the group of children born very premature performed significantly worse than the children born at term on all language areas assessed including spoken word awareness, semantics, grammar, discourse and pragmatics.

"Language development is a clinically important area of development concern in these children. Paying close attention to a premature babies' language development is essential for parents so that discrepancies from normal development can be discovered and addressed during early childhood."

Researchers from the Institute are now developing a new preventive intervention for premature babies, which they hope will enhance language development, along with other functional outcomes.

Published in Industry News
Monday, 11 July 2011 19:05

Alcohol Risk for Preterm Birth

A recent study conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health has confirmed that heavy alcohol consumption during pregnancy increases the risk for low birth weight, preterm birth, and small size for gestational age.

 

Published in Industry News
Thursday, 16 June 2011 09:46

Blood Test to Predict Preemies

Worldwide one in 10 mothers give birth prematurely. There are numerous health and psychosocial factors that are associated with preterm birth, however the reason for many baby's early arrival remains a mystery. This means that historically, the ability to predict who will have a premature baby has been quite poor. That is, at least until a new study claims to be capable of detecting more than 80% of preterm births with a second trimester blood test.

 

Published in Industry News
Friday, 05 August 2011 16:56

Blind Kids Catch Wave

Retinopathy of prematurity is a disorder of the eye that preterm infants are most at risk for in the neonatal period. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disease affecting the growth of blood vessels of the retina of preterm infants; it can be mild with no visual deficits, or it can be severe resulting in retinal detachment and blindness.

 

Published in Industry News
Monday, 09 May 2011 18:59

Oxygen Level & Preemies

Premature babies have underdeveloped lungs when they are born and so often require supplemental oxygen to survive. However, the level of oxygen needed to help preemies without causing other health problems has been a cause of much debate. A scientific publication in the New England Journal of Medicine has concluded that higher oxygen concentrations improve survival, but also note that this is not necessarily without risks.

 

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 06 June 2012 19:39

Preemie Help Competition!

Calling all Preemie Parents!

Help Preemie Help, Help Preemies - by entering our preemie photo competition with the chance to win great prizes including, the preemiehelp ebook, “The Complete Guide to: Preemie Development.” and a Earlybirds Gift voucher (2 x $50) from Earlybirds

Enter as many categories you like for a chance to win. The categories are;

  • 1. life in the NICU
  • 2. my brave preemie
  • 3. look at me now!

To enter, visit Earlybirds facebook page at www.facebook.com/earlybirds and make a comment, and then email your photo to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with the title “photo competition - and the category the entry is for”

Best entries will appear on preemiehelp.com and competition winners will be announced on the 30th June. The competition winners as well as our highly recommended entries will also go toward developing a promotional video, please let us know if you would prefer not to be involved, you will still be eligible for the prizes.


Published in Industry News
Friday, 23 November 2012 10:19

Brain Growth & Preemies

Neuroscientists in the US have found that the rate of brain growth in the weeks before preterm babies reach their expected due date is related to their cognitive (thinking and learning) abilities as children. It was found that between 24 to 44 weeks postmentrual age (PMA) that the rate of cerebral cortical growth is able to predict complex cognitive functioning but not motor skills in later childhood. Postmentrual age refers to your preemies gestational weeks plus their chronological age.

The study involved performing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain of 82 preterm infants up to 8 times. They also took part in a battery of neuropsychological tests at age 2 and 6 years.

The results indicate that the period before a full term brith, the last gestational weeks in the uterus, are critical for brain development, so for preemie babies the more the cerebral cortex grows early in life the better their outcome when they reach 6 years of age.

Published in Industry News
Friday, 06 January 2012 13:44

Parent Talk: Important for Preemies

An article recently published in the journal of Pediatrics reported that preterm babies who are exposed to their parents’ voices while in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU for short) have better vocalizations at 32 and 36 weeks gestational age.

A number of studies have reported that speech and language development can be delayed in preterm babies. The environment that a preterm baby is exposed to in the NICU is vastly different than that of a fetus of the same gestational age. The NICU exposes preterm babies to high levels of noise, yet while they are in the isolette little language is audible unless it is directed into the hole of the isolette. In contrast, while a fetus is in utero, mother’s voice is a major stimulus and this occurs during the development of the auditory system.

Numerous studies have reported on the importance of early language experience for normal development of speech and language processing; the more a parent talks to their children, the faster their vocabularies grow and the higher the child’s IQ. Since early language experience and exposure is important for language development and IQ, it is important to understand the experience of very preterm babies in the NICU because their sensory experience is so different to babies born full term.

Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics, Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island conducted a study to determine whether preterm babies exposed to more adult language would make more vocalizations. Vocalizations include any utterances, sounds made by the baby.

The study included 36 preterm babies with birth weights of 1250 grams or less and 16-hour recordings of the preterm baby’s environment in the NICU at 32 and 36 weeks’ gestational age were carried out. The researchers found that infant vocalizations were detected as early as 32 weeks and this increased significantly up to 36 weeks, this means that preterm babies start making vocalizations at least 8 weeks earlier than the typical starting date for a newborn baby. They also found that the number of conversational turns per hour were much higher when a parent was present.

The researchers conclude that for preterm babies, exposure to parental talk was a strong predictor of vocalizations at 32 weeks and conversational turns at 32 and 36 weeks than language from other adults. This highlights the importance of parent talk for preterm babies while in the NICU.

Published in Industry News
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Preemie, Premmie, or Prem?

Most babies spend between 38 and 42 weeks in their mother’s uterus. So, technically a preterm birth, preemie, premmie, or prem, is an infant who is born less than 37 completed gestational weeks. 


Read More: Defining Preterm birth


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New Release - Preemie Development

All in one easy to read eguide

‘The complete preemie guide to: ‘Preemie development’ is the must have guide to the NICU for new preemie parents.

With an easy-to-read layout this comprehensive guide is over 130 pages of important information about the NICU and your preemie.

Using Adobe’s .pdf format makes the guide usable across a wide range of platforms from ipad to PC, smartphone to macbook.

Packed with extra features like progress charts, NICU checklists and plenty of others. ‘The preemie guide’ is a must for any new parents.


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