Wednesday, 14 September 2011 17:42

Preemie Parents and Pain

Educating preemie parents on recognizing and responding to pain in their baby has been shown to lift the confidence of parents once they leave the hospital or neonatal intensive care unit (NICU for short). A new study in the UK conducted a research project involving 169 parents of preeemies. Half of these preemie parents received a booklet and 2 training sessions with a nurse on how to care for their preemie's pain, while the other parents received a general parenting booklet without specific training. The information provided to preemie parents included training on how babies process pain and techniques for comforting babies during painful procedures. Typically preemie parents receive very little formal training on pain management so this study may help change practices in the NICU.

 

Published in Industry News
Thursday, 16 June 2011 09:46

Blood Test to Predict Preemies

Worldwide one in 10 mothers give birth prematurely. There are numerous health and psychosocial factors that are associated with preterm birth, however the reason for many baby's early arrival remains a mystery. This means that historically, the ability to predict who will have a premature baby has been quite poor. That is, at least until a new study claims to be capable of detecting more than 80% of preterm births with a second trimester blood test.

 

Published in Industry News
Monday, 07 July 2014 11:49

Preterm Birth Breakthrough: Infections

Estimates of preterm birth in Australia suggest one in 12 or approximately 8% of Australian babies is born preterm. The incidence worldwide is even higher, approximately 10%, meaning around 15 million babies are born preterm annually. The estimated cost is very high and Australia spends approximately $500 million per year on their care, whilst the United States spends more than $17 billion.

One of the causes of preterm birth is intrauterine infection or inflammation caused by infection. Experts in the field hypothesise that vaginal microorganisms break the cervical barrier, colonise the fetal membranes, and infect the amniotic cavity. The expectant mother's auto-immune response consistenting of a vigorous inflammatory reaction results in preterm birth.

An incredible breakthrough achieved at the University of Western Australia, King Edward Memorial Hospital, has described the ability of an antibiotic - solithromycin - to potentially cross the placenta and kill infections responsible for many preterm births. Professor Jeffrey Keelan estimated that up to 30% of preterm births could be prevented using this new antibiotic, solithromycin. Most of the benefits would be attributed to saving the very early prems.

The research behind this exciting breakthrough involved measurements in sheep and the crossover from sheep to human placentas is about 50% compared with only 2-4% for older antibiotics and it's 10 to 100 times stronger. Researchers report that the next step is to, confirm that in pregnant women, that the antibiotic crosses the placenta and destroys harmful bacteria. If research grants are successful clinical trials will take place between Western Australia and the United States.

This is a significant finding as currently used antibiotics are largely ineffective at destroying harmful bacteria or are unable to cross the placenta at high enough levels, thereby unable to prevent the preterm birth from occuring.

Published in Industry News
Tuesday, 19 April 2011 17:46

Price Slashed-Preemie prevention drug

KV Pharmaceutical Co., the maker of an expensive drug to prevent premature births slashed the price by more than half on Friday (1st April 2011), following an outcry over the high cost and moves by federal regulators to keep a cheap version available.

 

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 12:26

NICU Stress

As parents of premature babies well know, their tiny immature baby is likely to spend at least some time in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The NICU is where premature babies will receive specialized medical care allowing time for immature organs to develop sufficiently.

Although there are a number of factors that are associated with poorer developmental outcomes in very premature babies little is understood about the exposure to stress in the neonatal intensive care unit. A new study has focussed on this topic by examining neonatal infant stress and its effect on brain development.

This study involved 44 premature babies born less than 30 weeks gestation and trained nurses recorded procedures and cares. Stress was measured using a tool called the Neonatal Infant Stressor Scale (NISS), which consists of 36 interventions that contribute to infant stress. These premature babies then undertook a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to evaluate the relationship between brain structure and function and infant exposure to stress.

The findings of this study suggest that for premature babies exposure to stressors in the neonatal intensive care unit is associated with reduced brain size. It is not clear what the long-term consequences are and the authors suggest that further research of stress exposure on the premature baby brain is needed to improve outcomes for premature babies.

Published in Industry News
Saturday, 21 January 2012 12:17

Training Preemie Parents

Recent research conducted in Norway has found that helping preemie parents better understand and interact with their babies may improve behavioral outcomes at school-age. This is an important finding as children born preterm are at greater risk for behavioral difficulties such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Preemies, particularly those who have been in intensive care units have been described as being more “difficult” and score less favorably in mood, adaptability, persistence, rhythmicity and distractibility than full term infants in standardized measures of temperament. Parents of preemies report that their babies are harder to understand, which can make it more challenging to successfully interact with them.

Researchers at the University Hospital of North Norway recruited 146 preemies born less than 2,000 grams (4 pounds, 6 ounces) who then either participated in a training program or undertook standard care only. Seventy-five full term infants were also recruited to be used as a baseline comparison. The intervention consisted of 8 sessions shortly before discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 4 home visits by specially trained nurses focusing on the infant's unique characteristics, temperament, and developmental potential and the interaction between the infant and the parents. A follow-up of these babies at age 5 years found that preemies whose parents received the training had fewer behavior problems, such as inattention, aggression, or withdrawn behaviour. A key point of this study is that teaching parents skills from the beginning of their baby’s life is important and particularly so for parents of preemies.

Published in Industry News
Friday, 03 June 2011 13:40

Flu Shot and Preterm Birth

Having a flu shot may reduce the risk of having a preterm birth. A new study in the US reported that women who received the vaccine and gave birth during the flu season were 40% less likely to have a baby born prematurely.

 

Published in Industry News
Sunday, 09 March 2014 12:26

New Preemiehelp Store!

Preemie Help is very excited to announce the launch of our Preemie Store!! We invite everyone to visit our site here and check out our cool gear. We have a range of products especially for preemies as well as gorgeous gifts for wonderful preemie mothers, or really anyone you think might deserve a special treat!!

 

Preemiehelp have had preemie clothes designed especially for preemies with a range of cool and cute designs.

Published in Industry News
Friday, 07 October 2011 11:02

New Article: ROP surgery

Preemie Help have just released a new article called, Retinopathy of Prematurity; Surgeries and Procedures. It provides some basic information about the surgeries and procedures used to treat preterm infants with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). This is an important topic as the smallest and sickiest preterm infants are at the greatest risk for ROP, understanding a little about what's involved can help with feelings of being overwhelmed and confused.

There a several studies being undertaken at the moment to try and improve outcomes following ROP and ways to prevent it in the first instance. Preemie Help will keep up-to-date with this information and post any new findings.

Retinopathy of Prematurity; Surgeries and Procedures can be found under the section "About Preemies" > "In the Hospital" > under the heading "Preemie Surgeries and Procedures."

Published in Industry News
Friday, 05 August 2011 16:56

Blind Kids Catch Wave

Retinopathy of prematurity is a disorder of the eye that preterm infants are most at risk for in the neonatal period. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disease affecting the growth of blood vessels of the retina of preterm infants; it can be mild with no visual deficits, or it can be severe resulting in retinal detachment and blindness.

 

Published in Industry News
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Preemie, Premmie, or Prem?

Most babies spend between 38 and 42 weeks in their mother’s uterus. So, technically a preterm birth, preemie, premmie, or prem, is an infant who is born less than 37 completed gestational weeks. 


Read More: Defining Preterm birth


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New Release - Preemie Development

All in one easy to read eguide

‘The complete preemie guide to: ‘Preemie development’ is the must have guide to the NICU for new preemie parents.

With an easy-to-read layout this comprehensive guide is over 130 pages of important information about the NICU and your preemie.

Using Adobe’s .pdf format makes the guide usable across a wide range of platforms from ipad to PC, smartphone to macbook.

Packed with extra features like progress charts, NICU checklists and plenty of others. ‘The preemie guide’ is a must for any new parents.


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