Sunday, 09 March 2014 12:26

New Preemiehelp Store!

Preemie Help is very excited to announce the launch of our Preemie Store!! We invite everyone to visit our site here and check out our cool gear. We have a range of products especially for preemies as well as gorgeous gifts for wonderful preemie mothers, or really anyone you think might deserve a special treat!!

 

Preemiehelp have had preemie clothes designed especially for preemies with a range of cool and cute designs.

Published in Industry News
Monday, 10 December 2012 17:45

L’il Aussie Prems Foundation

L’il Aussie Prems Foundation is Australia’s largest online support community and forum for families of prematurely born children and sick newborns. They are a voluntary not-for-profit organisation set up to provide online support, raise awareness, bring parents together who have traveled a similar path whilst encouraging families to share their personal and unique journey through our website. No matter where families are located geographically, our website and support services are assessable 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The Foundation’s website was initially established in 2007 by a premmie mum who gave birth to her first son at 27 weeks gestation. The forum and website continue to offer a lifeline to families. In October 2012, with the goal of expanding the online support provided to families, L’il Aussie Prems Foundation became a registered charity, incorporated in the state of Victoria.

The Foundations committee members are all parents who have each experienced a very personal and unique journey after the premature birth of their children. As members of the forum community for many years, they each understand the vulnerability parents feel in a similar situation, the importance of an online community and the integral role the Foundation plays with offering a safe and supportive environment to each family.

Published in Industry News
Saturday, 21 January 2012 12:17

Training Preemie Parents

Recent research conducted in Norway has found that helping preemie parents better understand and interact with their babies may improve behavioral outcomes at school-age. This is an important finding as children born preterm are at greater risk for behavioral difficulties such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Preemies, particularly those who have been in intensive care units have been described as being more “difficult” and score less favorably in mood, adaptability, persistence, rhythmicity and distractibility than full term infants in standardized measures of temperament. Parents of preemies report that their babies are harder to understand, which can make it more challenging to successfully interact with them.

Researchers at the University Hospital of North Norway recruited 146 preemies born less than 2,000 grams (4 pounds, 6 ounces) who then either participated in a training program or undertook standard care only. Seventy-five full term infants were also recruited to be used as a baseline comparison. The intervention consisted of 8 sessions shortly before discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 4 home visits by specially trained nurses focusing on the infant's unique characteristics, temperament, and developmental potential and the interaction between the infant and the parents. A follow-up of these babies at age 5 years found that preemies whose parents received the training had fewer behavior problems, such as inattention, aggression, or withdrawn behaviour. A key point of this study is that teaching parents skills from the beginning of their baby’s life is important and particularly so for parents of preemies.

Published in Industry News
Saturday, 15 October 2011 13:54

Stem Cells may Prevent Preterm Birth

A break through in stem cell cell research could help thousands of women at risk of having a preterm birth. Findings reported in the journal “Tissue Engineering” have discovered that they can manipulate the stem cells to make a material that is almost the same as a woman’s natural membrane that surrounds the fetus. This would act as a sort of “repair” patch to prevent preterm birth. This is very important because up to 40% of preterm births are caused by preterm premature rupture of the membrane (known as PPROM).

According to researchers at the Reading school of pharmacy a treatment could be available within 4 years. Their team have been able to grow the sac membrane that surrounds the fetus using stem cells from placentas obtained after birth. Reportedly, only one donation is required to produce thousands of patches to help preserve pregnancies at risk of preterm birth.

There repair patches are likely most beneficial for woman whose membranes rupture before 24 weeks gestation, where the preterm infant has less chance of survival due to the immaturity of their lungs. One of the most common causes of PPROM is infection, other risk factors are bleeding in the first half of the pregnancy, carrying twins, and when the fetus is surrounded by too much amniotic fluid.

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 20 August 2014 08:51

Prevention of Preemie Parent Distress

The birth of a preterm infant can cause significant psychological distress for parents and families. In particular it has been consistently reported that the birth and hospitalisation of an unwell baby is associated with high levels of distress and depressive symptoms in the mother of the infant. Most research in this area has focused on the mother of preterm infants but some research groups are now trying to evaluate the emotional affect preterm birth also has on fathers.

Research suggests that 10% of mothers of infants with very low birth weight (VLBW; infants born less than 1,500 g) report severe symptoms of psychological distress in the neonatal period which is five-fold the rate of term mothers, and almost one-third of mothers of VLBW infants have clinically meaningful levels of depression and anxiety.

A research team in the United States have recently evaluated a treatment intervention developed for reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety in parents of preterm babies.

There were 105 mothers of preterm infants who particpated in the study. The gestational age of preemies ranged from 25 to 34 weeks' gestational age and all were born more than 600grams. The 105 participants were randomly selected to be part of 2 groups; 1)intervention group - these mothers received 6 sessions of intervention which combined trauma-focused treatments, including psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, progessive muscles relaxation, and development of their trauma narrative. It also included material which targeted infant redefinition - changing the mother's negative perceptions of her baby and the parenting experience; 2)control group - these mothers were described as an active comparison group who received an education session.

The research findings were positive for the intervention group - mothers greater reduction in trauma symptoms and depression, both groups reported less anxiety, and mothers who experienced higher NICU stress before the intervention benefited more from the intervention than mothers who reported low NICU stress.

The researchers concluded that, "This short, highly manualized intervention for mothers of preterm infants reduced symptoms of trauma and depression. The intervention is feasible, can be delivered with fidelity, and has high ratings of maternal satisfaction. Given that improvements in mothers’ distress may lead to improved infant outcomes, this intervention has the potential for a high public health impact.

Research such as this could be a great step in lessening the burden and stress for families of preterm infants who often have to deal with many and varied challenges.

Published in Industry News
Friday, 03 June 2011 13:40

Flu Shot and Preterm Birth

Having a flu shot may reduce the risk of having a preterm birth. A new study in the US reported that women who received the vaccine and gave birth during the flu season were 40% less likely to have a baby born prematurely.

 

Published in Industry News
Sunday, 29 January 2012 15:58

Steroids Help Micro Preemies

A recent study has found that treating women at risk of preterm birth as early as 22 to 23 weeks gestation improved the survival of extremely preterm infants. Babies born this early are colloquially called micro preemies. Due to extreme prematurity, micro preemies have a reduced chance of survival and are at increased risk for a number of health complications, such as respiratory distress syndrome, patent ductus artiosus, retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular hemorrhage.

Women who are at risk of preterm delivery are treated with antenatal corticosteroids (steroids for short) to help the infant’s immature lungs develop. Various studies have provided evidence for the effectiveness of steroids for decreasing mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Typically, women at high risk of preterm birth between 24 to 34 weeks gestation are treated with steroids, however the use of steroids in women between 22 to 26 weeks gestation has been low and there is wide international and regional variation in their use. A research team in Japan sough to evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids to improve neonatal outcomes for infants born at less than 24 weeks of gestation. This was an important study as steroid use at this early stage may have large ramifications for survival and morbidity in the most vulnerable and tiniest of preterm babies.

The study involved the analysis of 11,607 infants born at 22 to 33 weeks gestation between 2003 and 2007. They evaluated the gestational age effects of treating women threatened with preterm birth with steroids on several factors related to neonatal morbidity and mortality. The most important finding of this study was that treatment with antenatal corticosteroids improved the survival of extremely preterm infants, including the tiniest micro preemies; babies born 22 to 23 weeks gestation.

Other results from the study demonstrated that steroid treatment was effective in decreasing respiratory distress syndrome, brain injury (intraventricular hemorrhage), surfactant use, and duration of oxygen use in preterm infants born between 24 and 29 weeks of gestation but not for the smaller micro preemies.

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 12:26

NICU Stress

As parents of premature babies well know, their tiny immature baby is likely to spend at least some time in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The NICU is where premature babies will receive specialized medical care allowing time for immature organs to develop sufficiently.

Although there are a number of factors that are associated with poorer developmental outcomes in very premature babies little is understood about the exposure to stress in the neonatal intensive care unit. A new study has focussed on this topic by examining neonatal infant stress and its effect on brain development.

This study involved 44 premature babies born less than 30 weeks gestation and trained nurses recorded procedures and cares. Stress was measured using a tool called the Neonatal Infant Stressor Scale (NISS), which consists of 36 interventions that contribute to infant stress. These premature babies then undertook a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to evaluate the relationship between brain structure and function and infant exposure to stress.

The findings of this study suggest that for premature babies exposure to stressors in the neonatal intensive care unit is associated with reduced brain size. It is not clear what the long-term consequences are and the authors suggest that further research of stress exposure on the premature baby brain is needed to improve outcomes for premature babies.

Published in Industry News
Saturday, 14 May 2011 22:07

Preterm Birth Risk for Asthma

According to a Swedish study infants born preterm are at greater risk for requiring medication for asthma during childhood and adolescence. Using data from national health and prescription registries the researchers reported that 4.9% of boys and 3.8% of girls had filled prescriptions for corticosteroids, which is the medication needed for sufferers of asthma. They found that infants born less than 39 weeks were more likely to need the medication, infact the more preterm a baby was born the more likely they required medication for asthma.

 

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 20 March 2013 17:06

Wear Green for Premmies

A SEA OF GREEN IN SUPPORT OF PREMMIE BABIES

Last year saw the phenomenal success of the annual ‘Wear Green for Premmies’ day, an event hosted by the L’il Aussie Prems Foundation and organisers are looking forward to this year’s fundraiser and hope to repeat that success again on Wednesday 3rd April 2013.

Wear Green for Premmies is a day where thousands of people in Australia and around the world wear green clothing or purchase wristbands to show their support and raise awareness of the trials and hardships of premature babies and their families.

Over the past two years, members and their families have joined in the celebration with photos being posted on the event's page to show a sea of green in support of all children born too soon. Last year saw thousands of Facebook participants including eight hospitals and many businesses showing their support.

Part of the proceeds from wristband sales from the past two years of celebrations has been equally distributed to charities and causes all over the country but this year proceeds will be used to purchase items and are being donated directly to 2 Special Care Nurseries and 2 Neonatal Intensive Care Units all for the benefit of affected families. Participants don't have to attend a physical event, but are invited to sign up to the Facebook event and encourage family and friends to wear green, purchase a wristband and fundraise online directly to support the cause.

Now entering into its third year of celebrations, the event and website has grown well beyond the expectations of Ms Toivonen who started the support website in 2007 after the premature birth of her first son at 27 weeks gestation. Ms Toivonen built the online support group as a way to reach out to new parents but also for her own family to gain support from others who had travelled a similar journey.

In late 2012, a committee was formed and the website soon became a registered not-for-profit charity. The committee comprises of parents themselves who are all long time members of the online community. The website and forum has blossomed over the past six years into Australia's largest online community and forum for families with prematurely born children and sick newborns.

For photo opportunities with families in your state or further information: Nicole Powell, Vice President (Communications), L’il Aussie Prems Foundation 0412 378 793 I This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it | Wantirna, Victoria


Preemiehelp is interested in hearing from you, please feel free to email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit our Facebook page by following this link

Published in Industry News
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Preemie, Premmie, or Prem?

Most babies spend between 38 and 42 weeks in their mother’s uterus. So, technically a preterm birth, preemie, premmie, or prem, is an infant who is born less than 37 completed gestational weeks. 


Read More: Defining Preterm birth


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New Release - Preemie Development

All in one easy to read eguide

‘The complete preemie guide to: ‘Preemie development’ is the must have guide to the NICU for new preemie parents.

With an easy-to-read layout this comprehensive guide is over 130 pages of important information about the NICU and your preemie.

Using Adobe’s .pdf format makes the guide usable across a wide range of platforms from ipad to PC, smartphone to macbook.

Packed with extra features like progress charts, NICU checklists and plenty of others. ‘The preemie guide’ is a must for any new parents.


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