Saturday, 21 May 2011 13:09

Stem Cells for Preemies

The children's charity Action Medical Research is funding a project aimed at developing a cure for a condition called Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP). ROP can lead to blindness in premature babies, putting the youngest, sickest and smallest babies most at risk, including over 3,000 babies who are born more than 12 weeks early each year in the UK.


Published in Industry News
Saturday, 27 October 2012 13:27

Caffeine & Preterm Infants

Caffeine therapy is frequently used to reduce apnea in infants born preterm. It has been shown to improve both short- and long-term outcomes in preemies born less than 1,250 grams. In an Australia study called Caffeine in Apnea of Prematurity (CAP for short) the proportion of infants with lung injury called bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) was lower when caffeine treatment started within the first 10 days of life compared with a placebo. Additionally, these researchers found that at 18 months preemies were less likely to be developmentally delayed or have cerebral palsy.

It is thought that the improvement in neurological outcome for preterm babies who have received caffeine therapy is due to the effect on cerebral white matter. Researchers from the CAP study reported that preemies who received caffeine for apnea may have more mature cerebral white matter organization. They also suggest that caffeine may be exerting a direct neuroprotective effect

The CAP study is now in the process of looking at the long-term outcome following caffeine treatment and will perform neuropsychological, lung functioning, and imaging analyzes on these children at age 11 years.

Published in Industry News
Tuesday, 19 April 2011 17:46

Price Slashed-Preemie prevention drug

KV Pharmaceutical Co., the maker of an expensive drug to prevent premature births slashed the price by more than half on Friday (1st April 2011), following an outcry over the high cost and moves by federal regulators to keep a cheap version available.


Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 14 May 2014 17:23

MRI, Extremely Preterm Birth & IQ

An Australia research group - Victorian Infant Collaborative Study - based in Melbourne investigates both short- and long-term outcomes associated with preterm birth. One of their studies has followed a large cohort, which includes participants from the 4 major children's hospitals in Victoria, 298 preterm survivors and 262 normal birth weight controls. These cohorts have had extensive evaluations of their growth and developments at 2, 5, and 8 years of age and were recently seen for a major follow-up including an extensive cognitive and visual assessment at age 8 years. In addition some 148 extremely preterm survivors and 132 term born controls received a magnetic resonance imaging scan of their brain in order to compare brain volumes from multiple brain tissues and structures as well as to explore the relationships of brain tissue volumes with IQ and basic educational skills.

IQ was assessed using the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) and Educational skills were assessed using the Wide Range Achievement Test(WRAT-4).

This research represents the largest regional neuroimaging cohort of adolescents born in the 1990s, which is very important as this cohort represents a group that received "new" medical interventions such as surfactant therapy and antenatal corticosteroids which had greater success in improving survival rates of the smallest and most preterm infants. The long-term outcomes of these survivors have not been well documented until this unique study.

The researchers found that extremely preterm adolescents had smaller brain volumes, lower IQs and poorer educational performance than babies born at term. They also reported that brain volumes of multiple tissues and structures are related to IQ and educational outcomes and concluded that smaller total brain tissue volume is an important contributor to the cognitive and educational underperformance of adolescents born extremely preterm.

The authors of this study suggested that examining brain volume is one of many ways to understand the neurological changes associated with preterm birth and fruther investigations might be able to determine the correlation between other structural and functional information obtained from advanced MRI, which might also provide a more global understanding of changes related to extreme prematurity in adolescence

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 09 November 2011 17:36

World Preemie Day Competition

Calling all budding writers! Join in the fun of World Prematurity Month by entering the best short story or poem competition and you’ll have the chance to win great prizes including, the ebook, “The Preemie Guide to: Surviving the NICU.” and a $100 Earlybirds Gift voucher from

In 500 words maximum engage our imagination by sharing your experience in the NICU. You have a unique perspective as a mother, father, brother, sister, grandmother, grandfather, or friend...?

To enter, visit Earlybirds facebook page at and make a comment, and then email your story to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with the title “short story competition”

Best entries will appear on and competition winners will be announced on the 17th November.

Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 04 July 2012 20:42

Photo Competition Winners Announced

Congratulations to the preemiehelp photo competition winners!

Thanks too all the people that entered our Preemiehelp Photo competition.

The winners share in great prizes including, the preemiehelp ebook, “The Complete Guide to: Preemie Development.” and a Earlybirds Gift voucher (2 x $50) from Earlybirds

And the Winners are...

After much deliberation we can annouce the winners of the Preemiehelp 'preemie photo competition' .

Prizes are awarded for 3 categories

  • Life in the NICU
  • My Brave Preemie
  • Look at Me Now 

After an overwhelming responce to the competition we are happy to announce that..

In First Place

Collecting a prize of $50 Earlybirds Voucher ( and a full set of the Preemiehelp "The preemie guide to: Surviving the NICU" & " The preemie guide to: Preemie development" is:

Angela Perry - Life in the NICU

With her winning photo - 

Photo: 1st - Angela Perry (Life in the NICU)



In Second Place

Collecting a prize of $50 Earlybirds Voucher ( and the Preemiehelp ebook " The preemie guide to: Preemie development" is:

Andrea Creighton - My Brave Preemie

With her winning photo -

Photo: 2nd - Andrea Creighton (My brave preemie)



In Third Place

Collecting a full set of the Preemiehelp ebooks  "The preemie guide to: Surviving the NICU" & " The preemie guide to: Preemie development" is:

Ken & Lisa Young - Look at me now

With their winning photo -

Photo: 3rd - Ken & Lisa Young (Look at me now)



Published in Industry News
Tuesday, 17 June 2014 14:59

Preemie Parents Skin

Talking about parent’s skin might seem weird – after all the skin barrier is fully developed and most people already have their own skincare regime. But preemie parents have some unique skincare needs primarily due to the unique environment of the NICU. If you’re a parent of a preemie baby you will be familiar with the humidity of the NICU – designed to prevent temperature instability, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalance caused by the immaturity of preemie skin. You’ll also be acutely aware of the importance of clean, sterilized hands when handling your prem. You no doubt have a ritual when arriving at the hospital that involves thorough hand washing and sanitizing. These two factors in particular often lead to very dehydrated and under-nourished hands. You probably also notice that your face and lips are also dry and sensitive.

You may not be able to abide by your usual skincare routine and your requirements are likely quite different. It is for these reasons we decided to work with skincare experts to formulate products specifically for preemie parent needs.

One of our best active ingredients in Sea Kelp.

What’s so Good about Sea Kelp?

The medicinal benefits of kelp have been renowned for centuries due to its ability to enhance health and beauty. The seawater where kelp grows contains an abundance of vitamins, minerals, trace minerals, proteins and enzymes that have wonderful benefits for the skin.

Sea Kelp Bioferment can be used as a great nutritive active to skincare lotions and moisturizers. Sea Kelp is firming, healing and soothing for any skin type and is a powerful nutritive moisturizer for normal and dry skin as well as having antioxidant properties, also a fantastic plus for the skin.

Sea Kelp can also help keep skin looking firmer and younger as it helps prevent loss of skin elasticity. Research has demonstrated that the iodine in Sea Kelp effectively removes free radicals - chemicals that accelerate ageing - from human blood cells.

If that wasn’t enough Sea Kelp also contains minerals like calcium, fluorine and magnesium that contribute to a more radiant skin tone. It is also rich in Vitamins A, B1, B2, C and E, as well as minerals such as magnesium, selenium and zinc - vitamins and minerals that are essential to regenerating skin cells and tissue.

The Product!

SEA KELP CORAL NICU HAND CREAM - PROTECTION FORMULA A RICH THICK BARRIER CREAM TO PROVIDE MOISTURIZING PROTECTION FOR HANDS DRY AND TIRED FROM LONG DAYS IN THE NICU This exceptional product provides cover when you need extra protection and will help prevent water loss from damaged skin. A careful blend including sea kelp coral helps soften, moisturize, and remove toxins from the skin. Perfect for skin regularly subjected to air-conditioning and hand sanitiser.

Published in Preemiehelp News
Monday, 11 July 2011 19:05

Alcohol Risk for Preterm Birth

A recent study conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health has confirmed that heavy alcohol consumption during pregnancy increases the risk for low birth weight, preterm birth, and small size for gestational age.


Published in Industry News
Wednesday, 04 May 2011 13:00

Probiotics, Key to Preterm Survival

Research championed by The University of Western Australia has concluded that thousands of preterm babies worldwide could be saved if probiotics were added to their feeds. The team of researchers reviewed 11 randomised trials in over 2,000 babies born more than six weeks prematurely and found survival was doubled in premature babies who received certain probiotics.


Published in Industry News
Sunday, 05 February 2012 14:45

NICU Dr, Successful Communicators?

A group of researchers based in Canada sought to find out if the information content, process, and social interaction of the antenatal consultation satisfies the informational needs of women admitted to hospital in preterm and threatened preterm labor. Many hospitals have recently moved toward the family/patient centered care, which includes providing as much information to the patient/family as possible so that they might be more involved in decision-making. One of the major hurdles to this process is when patients are suffering high degrees of anxiety as it negatively affects their perception of the successfulness of communication between physician and patient. Since, preterm labor or threatened preterm labor is stressful for patients it is important to ascertain whether current communication strategies are successful when interacting with these patients.

The typical process – obstetricians request an antenatal consultation for patients admitted in preterm or threatened preterm labor. Consultation is usually provided by the attending neonatologist or could also be neonatal fellow, neonatal nurse practitioner, or paediatrician; the mother is visited by the attending neonatologist for follow-up.

Women included in this study were those with preterm or threatened preterm labor of between 25 and 32 weeks’ gestation. Participants completed a antenatal consultation questionnaire (ACQ); it included 30 questions about the content (type and amount of information given), process (how information was given) and social interaction of physicians. They also wanted to know whether the consultation process was helpful in relieving some of their worry and anxiety.

Results from the study found that study, respondents almost always recalled receiving information on the topics of survival, most likely regarding medical problems and treatments that the baby might need. Mothers reported that information on risk of disability was provided less consistently. Participants who recalled receiving information about disability were also less satisfied with the amount of information provided on this topic compared with other topics. Only 12% of participants disagreed that the consultation helped relieve their worry, suggesting that receiving information may contribute to increasing knowledge and understanding of the condition and risks, but it may also increase anxiety in some people.

Other researchers have suggested that patients want information, even in situations of uncertainty, like preterm labor, and that they feel more satisfied with the consultation if doctors share information about uncertainty. It is important for neonatologists to have frank and open discussions about uncertainty in prognosis, including the risk of disability.

Study conclusion –the mothers who responded to the antenatal consultation questionnaire were generally satisfied with the information provided during the antenatal consultation but remained highly anxious.

Published in Industry News
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Preemie, Premmie, or Prem?

Most babies spend between 38 and 42 weeks in their mother’s uterus. So, technically a preterm birth, preemie, premmie, or prem, is an infant who is born less than 37 completed gestational weeks. 

Read More: Defining Preterm birth



New Release - Preemie Development

All in one easy to read eguide

‘The complete preemie guide to: ‘Preemie development’ is the must have guide to the NICU for new preemie parents.

With an easy-to-read layout this comprehensive guide is over 130 pages of important information about the NICU and your preemie.

Using Adobe’s .pdf format makes the guide usable across a wide range of platforms from ipad to PC, smartphone to macbook.

Packed with extra features like progress charts, NICU checklists and plenty of others. ‘The preemie guide’ is a must for any new parents.